WOOL GUIDE

We all know wool fabrics are warm and quite water-repellent but what's the difference between cashmere, merino, mohair and lamb's wool? Read our quick guide below to find out.

A LITTLE WOOL INTRO
All wool fiber consist of small, overlapping sections, similar to scales, which absorbs up to 30% of its own weight in moisture without becoming wet or damp (why wool also dries faster than cotton). This, in combination with the small natural air pockets in between overlapping sections, makes it the perfect fiber for winter garments and products as it will keep you very warm.

MERINO WOOL
Merino wool comes from the merino sheep, and it has incredible softness, great breathing ability, superior shine and a high warmth-to-weight ratio. The wool is naturally white which makes it easy to dye in all shades of colors. We often use merino wool in our thinly knitted sweaters as the merino fiber is softer and finer than regular sheep’s wool.

LAMB'S WOOL
Lamb’s wool fiber is wool from sheep less than seven months old. It has a softer hand touch than standard wool and we sometimes use it for knitted garments or throws in our collections. It has the same characteristics as sheep wool, although the texture is softer.

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WOOL FAVORITES

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MOHAIR WOOL
Mohair wool comes from the angora goat and it is well-known for its sheen and silky look. The fiber is very durable, strong, breathable and lightweight. We use mohair in suit jackets, dresses, sweaters and throws as it is non-pilling, does not stretch and it drapes well.

CASHMERE WOOL
Cashmere wool is an extremely soft fiber from the cashmere goat, native to India, Tibet, Iran, Iraq and China. The cashmere fibers are actually the wool fiber closest to the body of the goat and not the exterior layer fiber. The wool is cultivated by combing the goat instead of clipping it and each goat produces less than 500 g of wool per year. This makes cashmere one of the most exclusive and most expensive fibers in the world.