This is when yarns are transformed into your table cloth, bedding, towel or sham. Before the yarns are placed in the loom, they’re strengthened using starch. This process ensures the yarns will withstand the strain from the loom.

The yarns are passed through a device that winds them up on a warping mill, a rotating wheel over which the warp is wound in sections. Once the yarns are in place, they’re transferred from the warping mill onto the warp beam where they’re evenly distributed. The warp and weft threads are then woven together to create our beautiful textiles.

The warp ends are threaded through a leasing reed that separates the yarns with even tension and keeps the warp at the correct width and density.
The warp beam is mounted onto the back of the loom.

The warp beam is mounted onto the back of the loom.

Each warp is threaded through a heddle which sits inside shafts that can be lifted up or down.

Each warp is threaded through a heddle which sits inside shafts that can be lifted up or down.

When the warp beam is placed, and the warp threads are correctly threaded the weaving can begin.

When the warp beam is placed, and the warp threads are correctly threaded the weaving can begin.

The weft threads go through the weave with the help of a projectile. The weft goes over and under the warp. How many threads the weft goes over and under varies depending on desired design.
Before finishing the weave, there’s a manual inspection to detect possible defects and correct them in the early stage of the production.

Depending on the desired result, there are different ways of weaving. Here are a few of the techniques we use:

• OXFORD has two weft threads that go across two warp threads, giving the fabric a silk-like and lustrous finish and a heavier, thicker character.

• POPLIN is a plain weave where the warp and weft threads will alternate one over the other resulting in a lighter and finer fabric than oxford and pinpoint oxford. Poplin is a popular fabric for formal and finer shirts worn to work and special occasions. At Lexington, we use poplin in our bedding as the crisp and cool properties make it ideal for the sweaty sleeper.

• PINPOINT OXFORD has two twisted weft threads that go across two warp threads making this fabric thinner and lighter than oxford. The yarn used in weaving pinpoint oxford is thinner than the ones used for oxford, but he fabric is still warmer and heavier than a poplin fabric and becomes softer with every wash.

An illustration of a simple poplin weave.

An illustration of a simple poplin weave.

An illustration of a simple poplin weave.

An illustration of a pinpoint oxford weave.

An illustration of a pinpoint oxford weave.

An illustration of a pinpoint oxford weave.

An illustration of an oxford weave.

An illustration of an oxford weave.

An illustration of an oxford weave.

• CHAMBRAY is a plain weave like poplin. The difference is that it has a melange effect due to the white weft and colored warp yarn used in weaving it.

• PERCALE is yet another plain weave with the weft going over every other warp. The fabric is medium weight and tightly woven but with a matte finish. It’s crispy and cool and breathes just fine despite its high thread count of 200+. That’s because the yarn used in weaving it is thin. We use percale in our American sheets and our fitted sheets. The quality is excellent for sheets because it is easy to wash, dry and care for as it has a very high durability.

• TWILL is created by passing the weft go over two or more threads in the weft before going under one or more. There’s an offset, between rows to create the characteristic diagonal lines in the fabric.

• DENIM is made with a colored yarn in the warp and white in the weft but is woven in a twill construction. Denim’s warp thread will go over two threads in the weft before going under one. It’s woven in a way that creates diagonal lines in the fabric. The underside of a denim fabric is typically lighter, whereas the underside of chambray is more like its face side.

• SATIN AND SATEEN are techniques where the connecting points between weft and warp are barely visible. The unique weaving pattern shared by both satin and sateen is that the weft passes multiple warp threads before interlacing under one warp. The difference between a satin and sateen is that sateen can only be made from cotton, whereas a satin can be made with any fiber (typically silk). Our cotton-sateen is lustrous and soft because of the weave and doesn’t pill. Although sateen is light, it tends to be insulating and trap heat because it drapes closely to your body.

• JACQUARD is different to the above-mentioned weaves mainly because of the special loom used. In a jacquard machine, the warp threads can be individually maneuvered. This results in complex patterns and bigger pattern reports.

They say knowledge is a virtue, so keep learning more about our process by clicking on the image below.

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STEP 4. FINAL TOUCHES

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STEP 4. FINAL TOUCHES