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The Dos and Don'ts of

The Dos and Don'ts of

Weddings

Planning a wedding is tough. When burning the candle at both ends — juggling work, a relationship, the hunt for the perfect venue, napkins and anything that suddenly seems elusive — the couple will eventually suffer a first-degree burn. Since it’s the small details that will be the most stress inducing, here are a few things brides, grooms and guests should think about before and during the “I Do’s.”

1. Oversharing too soon
The love of your life declared his/her eternal love and is willing to share eternity with you. Understandably, you’d want to share the news of that enviable ring you’re now wearing with the hit of a single button. But hold your phone! Though most people in your life will be happy to read the exciting news about your upcoming wedding, your mom, aunt, best friend won’t appreciate finding out through social media, or worse, through your mom’s nosey neighbor Carin in front of the produce at Whole Foods. So, make sure you’ve shared the happy news with your click before you hit send on Instagram.

If you’re a guest who took Louvre-worthy photos of the couple, share the photos with them and ask if it’s ok to post them online before you do so.

2. Drinking colored beverages
We hear ya! You can’t get jiggy with it to your SO’s favorite tune unless you have a glass of red or brown liquor in your system. But guess what, you or your partner is probably wearing something white. As we know, white is a magnet for all types of stains. So let’s not add that type of stress to the already long, tiring but happy day. Stick to clear liquids to avoid any mishaps. Same goes for when it comes to your food. As for the guests, try to put your colorful drinks and food away from the couple when they’re around you. You don’t want to be the one who ruined the expensive shirt and/or dress.

Though you thanked all your guests at your wedding, sending thank-you notes is a must.

Though you thanked all your guests at your wedding, sending thank-you notes is a must.

For your guest tables, opt for dual purpose centerpieces. Delicate edibles are great substitute for dry sheet cake and expensive flowers.

For your guest tables, opt for dual purpose centerpieces. Delicate edibles are great substitute for dry sheet cake and expensive flowers.

3. Spending little to no time with guests
Your friends and family have probably spent a lot of money to celebrate your union, and though you’re most likely in a haze of newlywed bliss, acknowledging their presence and efforts on your happiest day is a must. Spend 5 to 10 minutes to catch up, take selfies and thank them individually lest they feel unseen.

Aunt Carin, we know you love the happy couple and just want to catch up, but don’t interrupt them when they’re sitting alone trying to take the day in. Don’t take up 30 minutes or more of their time when they finally approach you to thank you for the lovely vase you got them. And by God, don’t ask them to pose for your Facebook photos during their first dance.

4. Wearing shoes for the first time on the wedding day
However comfortable your shoes maybe when you first try them on, you should walk around in them at home a few hours a day, a month or two before the big day. Even if you’re wearing flats. “Blood on the Dance Floor” is a great tune, but we don’t want someone to miss dancing to Michael Jackson’s grunts because there’s actual blood from your feet on the dancefloor.

5. Inviting them to pre-wedding parties, but not the wedding
Your budget is tight and the venue is too small, so you can’t invite everyone to the wedding. That’s completely understandable. But don’t invite friends and family to the bachelor/bachelorette and or engagement party if they’re not invited to see you walk down the aisle. It’s rude.

And if you’re a bridesmaids and groomsmen planning a surprise bachelorette/bachelor party. DON’T! You don’t want to accidently exclude an important guest or invite someone who isn’t invited to the wedding. The latter would ultimately force the couple to invite said person and use part of their honeymoon money to pay for the extra cost. So to save friednships and dollars, get the guest list approved by the couple.

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