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CEO & Creative Director CEO & Creative Director

CEO & Creative Director

Kristina's Manhattan Guide

Where does Kristina Lindhe, CEO and founder of Lexington Company, hang out when she’s in the city? Here’s a list of places she frequents and wants to visit. Seek them out and hang out, eat and shop like a CEO.

Where to eat

The Dutch —The low and ambient lights, white-painted brick and shiny black horseshoe banquettes all add to the charm of this place. "I love the lively atmosphere at this restaurant,” Kristina said.
The Dutch is a place for those who love real comfort food and attracts a casually upscale crowd. Despite the name, American food is what’s on the menu. And as stated on their website, it’s where you’ll find things that make owners Andrew Carmellini, Josh Pickard and Luke Ostrom happy. Expect homey fried chicken, seasonal locally sourced salads and incredible pies.

Kobeyaki — If you’re looking for a fast-casual restaurant head down to one of Kobeyaki’s outposts in the city. The setting is casual, and the food is delicious, healthy and creative. “If you have one thing at this place, make it the California roll. I absolutely love it,” Kristina said.
Besides, the rolls, you’re offered, bowls, buns and burgers inspired by urban Japan and New York — a marriage designed with sustainability in mind. Meats are sourced from humane, family farms that don’t use antibiotics or hormones, owner Brian Konopka told DNAinfo. They also use recycled packaging and compost discarded food. In other words, it’s where you’ll enjoy fast food without the guilty conscience that comes with it.

Despite the different interior design elements in different areas of Saxon & Parole, each one of those elements contributes to emphasize the restaurant's concept.

Despite the different interior design elements in different areas of Saxon & Parole, each one of those elements contributes to emphasize the restaurant's concept.

Saxon & Parole — Lovers of horses, meat and house-made whiskey visiting the city shouldn’t miss Saxon & Parole. It’s a meat-centric restaurant like no other in New York City. As New York Time’s Eric Asimov once wrote, the restaurant’s ambience is “part bluegrass men’s club, part Cracker Barrel.” It’s actually one of many places Kristina wants to visit. “I heard the Impossible Burger is not to be missed,” she said.
According to the restaurant’s website, the Impossible Burger is a way for the team to “make the global food system more sustainable, … without compromising that burger ‘experience' meat lovers crave.” The burger, which is available on a first-come first-serve basis, is made entirely from plants, but it doesn’t taste like it.
If you miss the opportunity to taste the burger a lot of locals are raving about, you won’t be disappointed by the menu. Try dishes like the spiced Long Island duck, grilled Berkshire pork chop, ricotta gnudi or Scottish salmon.
The restaurant is named after two 19th-century racehorses which is why you'll see equestrian themed decor like the wagon wheel chandelier at Saxon & Parole.

The restaurant is named after two 19th-century racehorses which is why you'll see equestrian themed decor like the wagon wheel chandelier at Saxon & Parole.

Though the restaurant has a wide selection of whiskeys displayed on rustic shelves, we've heard that their homemade whiskey isn't to be missed

Though the restaurant has a wide selection of whiskeys displayed on rustic shelves, we've heard that their homemade whiskey isn't to be missed

Where to Shop

ABC Carpet & Home — Here’s where you’ll find a slew of diverse and creative collections to style not only your home with but also to update your jewelry box and to stock your bathroom cabinet. The store offers everything from carefully curated jewelry by local artisans to handmade bowls and carpets. “The venue alone is gorgeous,” Kristina said. “You could easily spend an entire day here.”

MoMa Design Store — Ditch the ridiculously expensive Statue of Liberty key chain souvenir sold to tourists at every side walk. Instead, head over to MoMa Design Store, a design junkie’s heaven and the perfect place to find unique, innovative gifts for friends and family. The store, which is “the world’s first curatorial department devoted to architecture and design,” focuses on celebrating good design by making it accessible to a wide audience. Expect to see a lot of tourists, but also celebrities shopping for souvenirs or new furniture for their home.

Aero — This studio/store owned by interior designer Thomas O’Brien is where public and private worlds collide. Through his own designs and refurbished furniture, O’Brien builds a collection that connects the past with the future. “It’s worth visiting since it’s an inspiring space for those looking to update their homes,” Kristina said.

Where to have fun

The High Line — Does stargazing and walking between clouds in a sky garden sound impossible in a city like New York City? The High Line erases the “im“ in impossible and heightens an average Manhattan walk. This public park built on an elevated rail structure offers one of the city’s many unique experiences. “The best way to experience the city is by taking long walks,” Kristina said. “And the High Line is great for that.”
Besides the amazing view and great walk, the High Line offers a public space where stargazing nights are run by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York every Tuesday April through October. It’s also a place where visitors can experience the intersection of nature, art and design. Walk between the landscape of Washington Grasslands, wild flowers, Allegheny serviceberry, magnolia trees, shrubs and art to the southernmost point of the High Line. There, you’ll find another NYC gem — Whitney Museum of American Art.

A view of the Whitney Museum and the High Line. Both are wheelchair accessible.

A view of the Whitney Museum and the High Line. Both are wheelchair accessible.

The museum hosts the Whitney Biennial, an art show where artists new to the American art scene are displayed.

The museum hosts the Whitney Biennial, an art show where artists new to the American art scene are displayed.

Whitney Museum of American Art — After a long walk on the High Line, a stop at the Whitney Museum is a must. It’s the first museum dedicated to the work of living American artists. The museum also purchases work created during the twentieth and twenty-first century. This kind of dedication offers a unique museum experience. You’ll find pieces by well-known artists such as Andy Warhol, Edward Hopper, Cy Twombly, Cindy Sherman and emerging artist such as Livia Corona Benjamin, Guadalupe Maravilla and Derek Fordjour.

The Honorable William Wall — Looking for a secret place to enjoy the city skyline? Try the floating bar called The Honorable William Wall and locally known as “the Willy Wall.” It’s the clubhouse of the Manhattan Yacht Club where drinks are served and where visitors can bring their own food to enjoy the sailing races in the New York City Harbor. “It’s one of many places an acquaintance has recommended, and it sounds like a fun experience,” Kristina said.

Now that you've got the skinny from our CEO, start experiencing one of few cities that will take you from Hopper's world to horse stalls and stores.

Dress for an adventurous day:

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